Key Charts - Too-Big-To-Fail

Financial Stability: Low-Income Countries Were Better Off During the Crisis
  • The peak-to-trough metric for return on equity shows that low income countries have had more stability in equity returns than any other income level.
  • The financial meltdown of 2008 caused a sudden shift in dynamics for high-income countries. Just prior to it, banks enjoyed a boom in profitability—high returns on assets and equity—while their stability was declining, as demonstrated by sliding Z-scores.
  • The impact of the crisis was mitigated for lower-income countries because their banking systems had little exposure to complex financial instruments such as mortgage-backed securities which can be verified by their higher return on assets and return on equity and increasing Z-scores from 2007 to 2008.

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Source: World Bank Global Financial Development Database

Financial Stability: Low-Income Countries Were Better Off During the Crisis

Too-Big-to-Fail Banks: An Update
From Too-Big-To-Fail Banks to Globally Systemically Important Banks
Too-Big-to-Fail Banks: Where Are We Now?
There’s More Than One Way to Rank the Biggest Banks
Banking Failures Have Tapered Off Since the Housing Market Bubble
Global Banks' Headquarters Become Less Concentrated
Size of Banks Varies Widely Across Countries
Decreasing Total Bank Assets to GDP (1999-2011)
Increasing Total Bank Assets to GDP (1999-2011)
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